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Facts and figures about Iolite.

 

 

Iolite: Gem of the Vikings

When Leif Eriksson and the other legendary Viking explorers ventured far out into the Atlantic Ocean, away from any coastline that could help them determine position, they had a secret gem weapon: iolite. The Viking mariners used thin pieces of iolite as the world's first polarizing filter. Looking through an iolite lens, they could determine the exact position of the sun, and navigate safely to the new world and back.

 

The property that made iolite so valuable to the Vikings is extreme pleochroism. Iolite has different colours in different directions in the crystal. A cube cut from iolite will look a Violet-ish blue almost like sapphire from one side, clear as water from the other, and a honey yellow from the top. This property led some people to call iolite "water sapphire" in the past, a name that is now obsolete.

 

Pleochroism may have been helpful in navigation but it makes things difficult for a gem cutter. If iolite is not cut from exactly the right direction, no matter the shape of the rough, its colour will not show to its best advantage.

 

The name iolite comes from the Greek 'Ios', which means violet. Iolite is usually a purplish blue when cut properly, with a softness to the colour that can be quite attractive.

 

Iolite is readily available and surprisingly affordable. The better and richer the blue, the better. It is mined in India, Sri Lanka, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, and Brazil. The Vikings probably mined iolite from deposits in Norway and Greenland.

 

Iolite is relatively hard but should be protected from blows. With its attractive colour and reasonable price, it may become a jewellery staple in the future.

 

 

 

 

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